BOTTON DOWN, SALUTE SISTERHOOD!

BOTTON DOWN, SALUTE SISTERHOOD!

BOTTON DOWN, SALUTE SISTERHOOD!

 

What a hot New Year's Eve it must have been, when the the lovers stripped off their clothes: Botton down! Salute sisterhood! Even in the gutter of Berlin's Leykestraße, a pair of pink panties with the feminist statement above the buttocks: 'Periods are cool' clings to the starched chest of a tuxedo shirt from the Ibbenbüren menswear factory Jassö Atelier. Whether the gallant in the smoking shirt got the cuffs when he read in the light of the street lamp the female avowal to bleeding: 'Periods are cool . And messy. And painful. And great.'

May the fashionably unequal couple desire and love each other - May the slogan on the panties be more than a phrase of the label Monki, rebellious daughter of H&M, which advertises with 'gender equality and sustainable consumption and production' .

Love is in the gutter - So the year 22 begins politically romantic and if Annett Louison had not already given herself musically to the gutter in 2019, we would reach her at the latest there with the words:

I celebrate the feast before I fall
I celebrate the feast before I fall
We are the dream couple from the gutter
And tonight you take me as your wife
We're somehow unbeatable
and only tomorrow
will be grey oh, oh
Oh oh
will be grey oh, oh
when we are grey oh, oh
listen to the song ....

Feldarbeit

Field Work

Aïcha Abbadi

CW 36 + 37

Field Work

 

In close proximity and yet in an entirely different world, an offsite fashion show is in the making on Tempelhof Field while an art and fashion fair is taking place inside the former airport.
Taking place within the city’s fashion week time frame, STREETWARE’S open air catwalk nonetheless operates within another temporal reality. Its clotheshorses on wheels are scattered in between families on picnic blankets gathered for a kite festivity, models walking undeterred through the paths of rollerbladers and skaters. Voices are muffled by the wind as different sources of music are transported in waves across the field. A van with three police officers stands by and quietly observes. The models are made up of performers, students and local neighbours. They are gettng changed, wearing outfits styled for them but in which they also had a say. The youngest, Marianna, is only one year old. Her mother, Sara, is also excited about her own first time modelling, although she notes that if she would continue doing it, she would have to buy herself a mirror, as she does not own one. Some finishing touches of hair and make-up are being added and the choreography rehearsed. Friends brought as support are waiting in anticipation, the first passersby curiously stopping in their tracks.

They demonstrated for fashion standards of a fairer future and as a contribution to the debate on body image and aesthetics:  Manuela Coelho | Marlene Sommer | NavaNaimaPan | Nazanin Shamloo  | Nomadin der Lüfte |Pauli | Philairone | Purvi Dhrangaderiya | Sara Tivane | Sarah Nevada Grether | Sophie Stolle | Zohara © Anja Grabert and Paolo Gallo

Learning about the concept behind the show, made up entirely by STREETWARE items, conversations about their own clothes unfold within the public. A group of friends and siblings, following sustainable stylist Mo Latif’s invitation, discusses the special bond created by garments shared with one another and passed on to someone close.

“I don’t know why but it actually makes me happier gettng it this way than buying it new.”

“Also because you have a connection with the person.”

“A deep connection, deep connection – she’s wearing a part of me, bringing a little part of me every day.”

In conversation with front-row guests .

Even though most of the show’s guest at first describe themselves as not very knowledgeable about fashion, it turns out that among them are former models, fashion designers, stylists, costume makers and sewing enthusiasts. Many are wearing garments which they have sewn or altered from second-hand pieces themselves, although one confesses to a passion to online shopping and trying out new styles found on online blogs. For those having moved to Berlin from abroad, the city has created a shiS in mindset, described as having a more conscious approach to fashion, with swaps and second-hand pieces part of the experience of living here.

One skater, at first irritated by the models in her way, becomes enthusiastic as she learns more about the background. It turns out she used to be a fashion designer but stopped working in the industry many years earlier due to its lack of fair practices. Not far away from her, another designer, VICENTE relates that it was at around the time she stopped that he really started. All the pieces he makes are one-of-a-kind, from up-cycled materials, which he has done so from the beginning.

 Manuela Coelho presenting, poltical haute couture‘ by Ruth Faith Nalule | Geneviève © Anja Grabert  

Manuela, modelling “the dress” from Uganda, relates a special connection to the garment which she describes as carrying the baggage of history and containing a piece of all corners of the world. Coming from Mozambique and having seen the consequences of textile waste firsthand, wearing the dress means more to her than just presenting it: she wishes to create awareness about the social and ecological consequences of fashion, as well as set an example for her children. Since growing up in wartime Mozambique, she has always been tending to garments, tailoring and repairing them to make them last longer, passing along those values in the family. Her daughter also walks in the show and as Manuela passes on the dress to her, it becomes a symbolic statement of passing on the future to the next generation.

Laura Marie Gruch | Manuela Coelho | Geneviève  presenting, poltical haute couture‘ by Ruth Faith Nalule © Anja Grabert  

As the catwalk show comes to its finale in a tableau with everyone involved, it generates even more attention. Those distracted up to that point with their own recreational activities, quickly note down further information as they learn the shown pieces are made available for rental the week after. The VESTITHEK, located in Neukölln’s Helene-NathanLibrary, on one of the top floors of a shopping arcade and well integrated between shelves filled with books and music albums, follows in the tradition of clothes lending libraries which have emerged in various locations. Among the first professionally run ones in Europe was Lånegarderoben, which opened in Stockholm in 2010. While most of them operate in individual shop spaces or community centres, the VESTITHEK’s integration into the municipal library opens up the concept to new publics. Appearing as if it had always been there, it merges old and new habits, starting a discussion by merely being present.

Die Große Wäsche

The Big Wash

The Big Wash

The BiG Wash - installation, performance, interventiuon at Waschsalon 115, Torstraße, Berlin-Mitte

'I don’t like washing but my job for now requires that I wash for my boss and her family. The children play outside, and the clothes get dirty. Sometimes, I hide what I find difficult to wash so that I don’t have to wash them.
I need this job so I must pretend that I like it and it’s the only way I get money to take care of my daughter and my family.' Juliet Laker, house help/maid

STREETWARE X MIVUMBA – barbara caveng, Beatrice Lamwaka | Eria Mutalwa | Jim Joël Nyakaana | Josephine Nakiyimba – SSuubi Design | KisituAloysius | Rose Katusabe | Ruth Faith Nalule
Concept and realisation at Waschsalon 115 - STREETWARE saved item – Alice Fassina, barbara caveng, Lotti Seebeck, Stephan C.Kolb
Special thanks to Tobias Breithaupt, managing director of Waschsalon 115 in Berlin - Mitte

A woman scrubs the 'big laundry' with a brush, maltreats the hems that limit her life. The traces are erased - the stains shine blindly. From 15 to 30 November 2021, a white sheet in the window of laundromat 115 on Berlin's Torstraße became a projection screen for videos in which women's hands rubbed textiles, providing an example of an economy of washing that is predominantly female but does not appear in any gross national product. Passers-by who walked across the threshold of Berlin's most famous laundromat on Rosenthaler Platz were confronted with images hurling at them from the drums of the machines: In colourful basins, hands wringed and trafficked the textile accumulation of their household. From pants to laundry, no intimacy was hidden from them, no trace of bodily divestment spared.

"Laundry, washing welfare" - The role of women is enmeshed in the history of washing ; colonial continuities are played out in the global divide between eco-wash and water bucket.

During an artist residency in Uganda in summer 21, barbara caveng let herself be guided by the laundry spread out on meadows and over hedges. Together with the author Beatrice Lamwaka, the fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, the photographer Jim Joël Nyakaana and the social entrepreneur Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa, laundry became their material for an artistic research and exploration about economy, ecology, feminisms and coloniality.

I have to do it - it is my routine

by Rose Katusabe | The Big Wash

'I always have a house help to wash but sometimes I must do it on my own. I don’t like but I must do. I have my clothes and my two daughters to wash. Every time, I am washing, I am thinking about money and how to get it.' Giovanna Lamunu, Lawyer

'I wash twice a week since the baby is always in pampers. I have a positive attitude towards washing but the problem finding time to wash because it takes so much time. There is a day when I kept my baby’s clothes not washed for two days and the stains refused to get off, because she had started drinking and eating, I think these ones need to be soaked with a strong detergent like for two days.

And I like clothes with a good smell after drying, so I prefer sunlight washing powder and put sosoft to soften her clothes and have a nice smell. If you are a stay home mother, I think washing every day is better or after one day; soak one day and wash the next day, and also, I must say that it's expensive to buy soap and other detergents.' Fortunate Tusasirye, new mother and Programme Assistant, FEMRITE

'I am responsible for my hygiene and health, so I must wash. I was for my partner as well. Sometimes, I wish he could assist me, and we wash together, and I also wish he could wear his clothes for a little longer, so I don’t have so many clothes to wash.' Giovanna Lamunu, Lawyer

to the left: Beatrice Lamwaka embroidering quotes from conversations about washing on bedsheets & to the right: 'female economy' barbara caveng © Lotti Seebeck

In cooperation with Beatrice Lamwaka, a series of interviews on the subject of washing was created. These explored together with the laundresses the physical and psychological effects of manual textile care without electricity and water as available commodities and explored the impact on the individual biographies, self-realisation and professional lives. Excerpts from the conversations were audible in one of the salon's clothes dryers: 'while doing laundry', one of the women interviewed said, she also thought about how her family could survive at all. 'I have to do it' - Rose Katusabe's voice rang out in the drum. 'It is my routine.'
Under the titel How to measure a man through handwashing an essay by Beatrice Lamwaka is published on our website. 

Is the washing machine the great liberator of women?

We explored this question in series of events at the salon with laundry maestro Stefan Targatz, director of the Laundry Museum Eberswalde, we embroidered with students of the master program Art in Context of the UDK while Beatrice Lamkwaka told about the daily routine of washing by women’s hand in Uganda and fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule sang a song of praise to love as the driving energy for any human action. Meanwhile, visitors to the laundromat unloaded their items from suitcases and bags into the washing drums and chose the appropriate program to wash their dirty laundry clean.

As a highlight we presented the industrial film ‚Wäsche - Waschen- Wohlergehen‘ (Laundry - Washing - Wellbeing), which was produced by Universum Film on behalf of the Henkel Group in 1931 and premiered in 32, a tribute and testimony in moving images to the belief in progress according to the social rules of a patriarchal society.

On the photographs: Alice Fassina | barbara caveng | Ruth Faith Nalule | Beatrice Lamwaka | Jim Joel Nyakaana | Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa | Sidney Noemi Stein | Stefan Targatz | ©Lotti Seebeck 

ps: Returning to Uganda, Ruth Faith Nalule sought out a laundromat - they exist in Kampala too, but their use is reserved for the few. During a telephone conversation on december 17 she demanded 'the right for all to use a washing machine - Our country must develop towards this before we die over the basin.'

'The Congress on the Clothes Dump' described a series of events between September and November 2021 dedicated to an inclusive and participatory philosophizing about the meaning of clothes, their production, distribution and consumption. Invited guests and random attendees digged into textonic layers, searched for solutions, questioned the ethics of the second skin. Clothing protects and adorns. It represents basic aesthetic and existential needs, but its mode of production destroys the environment on a large scale and endangers the physical and psychological well-being of the people who cope with the manufacturing processes in socially intolerable conditions. How could sustainable production and economy look like - this is what we explored between November 16 and 28 together with author Beatrice Lamwaka, fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, photographer Jim Joel Nyakaana and Social Entrepreneur and environmental activist Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa in a multi-perspective way. Venues for the public pondering were Bikini Berlin, the laundromat 115 in Torstraße and the Vestithek in the Helene Nathan Library.

Poltische Haute Couture – STREETWARE X MIVUMBA im Bikini Berlin

Poltische Haute Couture – STREETWARE X MIVUMBA im Bikini Berlin

Poltische Haute Couture – STREETWARE X MIVUMBA im Bikini Berlin

Politische Haute Couture in der Box 12 der Galerie SLP i Bikini Berlin 19.11. -29.11.2021 © Astra Pentaxia

On September 12, STREETWARE invited to the catwalk of the socio-economic utopia at Tempelhofer Feld as part of the Berlin Fashion Week. Thirty models presented saved items from the Berlin asphalt and questioned the production methods of the fast fashion, but also the behavior of consumers. The canon of beauty ideals and aesthetics dictated by the fashion industry was put up for discussion by shiny people with bodies beyond the norm.

From November 19, some of their effigies were presented as large-format prints on canvas opposite photographs taken during a session in Kampala, the capital of Uganda, in July this year in collaboration between Ruth Faith Nalule, Eria Mutalwa, Rose Katusabe, Reagan Ahabwe, barbara caveng and photographer Jim Joël Nyakaana .

The images provided the aesthetic context for the presentation of the first pieces from Ruth Faith Nalule's collection of political haute couture. Behind bars, Box No12 of Galerie SLP at Bikini Berlin became the setting for an exploration of how much colonial continuity we wear on our skin and how much of the world we want to further destroy with fashion.

Die fashion designerin Ruth faith Nalule im ‚cage dress‘ an der Eröffnung am 19.11. im Bikini Berlin© Astra Pentaxia und  Purvi Dhranghadaryia

"There is no escape" - Ruth Faith Nalule's creations of 'political haute couture' describe the clash of European second-hand clothing exported to Africa and local manufactured fabric and garments: associations and images are connected, colonial continuity is interrupted:  The pin-up bunny is no longer grinning from the chest of a T-shirt by a Japanese Label, but sits fat on the bottom of a dress that fuses traditional Kitenge with an animal print dressing gown from Victoria's Secret, a lumberjack shirt from Germany and a Nike shirt: 'Blood the Body' lettering cut from a fast-fashion shirt, reminiscent of the Black Live Matters movement as underarm cuffs.. At the opening, the fashion designer and fashion activist wears the 'cage dress': her body, wrapped in a dress made again of kitenge, is caught in a mesh of strips of tire material, additionally knotted with sisal cord.

'The Congress on the Clothes Dump' described a series of events between September and November 2021 dedicated to an inclusive and participatory philosophizing about the meaning of clothes, their production, distribution and consumption. Invited guests and random attendees digged into textonic layers, searched for solutions, questioned the ethics of the second skin. Clothing protects and adorns. It represents basic aesthetic and existential needs, but its mode of production destroys the environment on a large scale and endangers the physical and psychological well-being of the people who cope with the manufacturing processes in socially intolerable conditions. How could sustainable production and economy look like - this is what we explored between November 16 and 28 together with author Beatrice Lamwaka, fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, photographer Jim Joel Nyakaana and Social Entrepreneur and environmental activist Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa in a multi-perspective way. Venues for the public pondering were Bikini Berlin, the laundromat 115 in Torstraße and the Vestithek in the Helene Nathan Library.

EDIth – Zeitschrift für Kultur

EDIth – Zeitschrift für Kultur [magazine for culture]

EDIth – Zeitschrift für Kultur [magazine for culture]

 

The Galerie Walden 'organized and realized the>EDITh< series with wall and shop window newspapers, in order to remain able to act in times of a global catastrophe. The final print edition is, so to speak, the haptic result of the series.' STREETWARE saved item is honored with a contribution about the 'Dresserie', the flag ship pop up store in the gallery space, where we invited urban people and Homini Circularis to a fitting! From 5/30/2021 to 6/30/2021 was our slogan:  'How about borrowing something? It's the new marketing concept, the modern way of shopping!'  
The magazine can be ordered via e-mail to info[at]galerie-walden.de for 9 € + shipping costs.

EN