Die Große Wäsche

The Big Wash

The Big Wash

The BiG Wash - installation, performance, interventiuon at Waschsalon 115, Torstraße, Berlin-Mitte

'I don’t like washing but my job for now requires that I wash for my boss and her family. The children play outside, and the clothes get dirty. Sometimes, I hide what I find difficult to wash so that I don’t have to wash them.
I need this job so I must pretend that I like it and it’s the only way I get money to take care of my daughter and my family.' Juliet Laker, house help/maid

STREETWARE X MIVUMBA – barbara caveng, Beatrice Lamwaka | Eria Mutalwa | Jim Joël Nyakaana | Josephine Nakiyimba – SSuubi Design | KisituAloysius | Rose Katusabe | Ruth Faith Nalule
Concept and realisation at Waschsalon 115 - STREETWARE saved item – Alice Fassina, barbara caveng, Lotti Seebeck, Stephan C.Kolb
Special thanks to Tobias Breithaupt, managing director of Waschsalon 115 in Berlin - Mitte

A woman scrubs the 'big laundry' with a brush, maltreats the hems that limit her life. The traces are erased - the stains shine blindly. From 15 to 30 November 2021, a white sheet in the window of laundromat 115 on Berlin's Torstraße became a projection screen for videos in which women's hands rubbed textiles, providing an example of an economy of washing that is predominantly female but does not appear in any gross national product. Passers-by who walked across the threshold of Berlin's most famous laundromat on Rosenthaler Platz were confronted with images hurling at them from the drums of the machines: In colourful basins, hands wringed and trafficked the textile accumulation of their household. From pants to laundry, no intimacy was hidden from them, no trace of bodily divestment spared.

"Laundry, washing welfare" - The role of women is enmeshed in the history of washing ; colonial continuities are played out in the global divide between eco-wash and water bucket.

During an artist residency in Uganda in summer 21, barbara caveng let herself be guided by the laundry spread out on meadows and over hedges. Together with the author Beatrice Lamwaka, the fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, the photographer Jim Joël Nyakaana and the social entrepreneur Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa, laundry became their material for an artistic research and exploration about economy, ecology, feminisms and coloniality.

I have to do it - it is my routine

by Rose Katusabe | The Big Wash

'I always have a house help to wash but sometimes I must do it on my own. I don’t like but I must do. I have my clothes and my two daughters to wash. Every time, I am washing, I am thinking about money and how to get it.' Giovanna Lamunu, Lawyer

'I wash twice a week since the baby is always in pampers. I have a positive attitude towards washing but the problem finding time to wash because it takes so much time. There is a day when I kept my baby’s clothes not washed for two days and the stains refused to get off, because she had started drinking and eating, I think these ones need to be soaked with a strong detergent like for two days.

And I like clothes with a good smell after drying, so I prefer sunlight washing powder and put sosoft to soften her clothes and have a nice smell. If you are a stay home mother, I think washing every day is better or after one day; soak one day and wash the next day, and also, I must say that it's expensive to buy soap and other detergents.' Fortunate Tusasirye, new mother and Programme Assistant, FEMRITE

'I am responsible for my hygiene and health, so I must wash. I was for my partner as well. Sometimes, I wish he could assist me, and we wash together, and I also wish he could wear his clothes for a little longer, so I don’t have so many clothes to wash.' Giovanna Lamunu, Lawyer

to the left: Beatrice Lamwaka embroidering quotes from conversations about washing on bedsheets & to the right: 'female economy' barbara caveng © Lotti Seebeck

In cooperation with Beatrice Lamwaka, a series of interviews on the subject of washing was created. These explored together with the laundresses the physical and psychological effects of manual textile care without electricity and water as available commodities and explored the impact on the individual biographies, self-realisation and professional lives. Excerpts from the conversations were audible in one of the salon's clothes dryers: 'while doing laundry', one of the women interviewed said, she also thought about how her family could survive at all. 'I have to do it' - Rose Katusabe's voice rang out in the drum. 'It is my routine.'
Under the titel How to measure a man through handwashing an essay by Beatrice Lamwaka is published on our website. 

Is the washing machine the great liberator of women?

We explored this question in series of events at the salon with laundry maestro Stefan Targatz, director of the Laundry Museum Eberswalde, we embroidered with students of the master program Art in Context of the UDK while Beatrice Lamkwaka told about the daily routine of washing by women’s hand in Uganda and fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule sang a song of praise to love as the driving energy for any human action. Meanwhile, visitors to the laundromat unloaded their items from suitcases and bags into the washing drums and chose the appropriate program to wash their dirty laundry clean.

As a highlight we presented the industrial film ‚Wäsche - Waschen- Wohlergehen‘ (Laundry - Washing - Wellbeing), which was produced by Universum Film on behalf of the Henkel Group in 1931 and premiered in 32, a tribute and testimony in moving images to the belief in progress according to the social rules of a patriarchal society.

On the photographs: Alice Fassina | barbara caveng | Ruth Faith Nalule | Beatrice Lamwaka | Jim Joel Nyakaana | Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa | Sidney Noemi Stein | Stefan Targatz | ©Lotti Seebeck 

ps: Returning to Uganda, Ruth Faith Nalule sought out a laundromat - they exist in Kampala too, but their use is reserved for the few. During a telephone conversation on december 17 she demanded 'the right for all to use a washing machine - Our country must develop towards this before we die over the basin.'

'The Congress on the Clothes Dump' described a series of events between September and November 2021 dedicated to an inclusive and participatory philosophizing about the meaning of clothes, their production, distribution and consumption. Invited guests and random attendees digged into textonic layers, searched for solutions, questioned the ethics of the second skin. Clothing protects and adorns. It represents basic aesthetic and existential needs, but its mode of production destroys the environment on a large scale and endangers the physical and psychological well-being of the people who cope with the manufacturing processes in socially intolerable conditions. How could sustainable production and economy look like - this is what we explored between November 16 and 28 together with author Beatrice Lamwaka, fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, photographer Jim Joel Nyakaana and Social Entrepreneur and environmental activist Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa in a multi-perspective way. Venues for the public pondering were Bikini Berlin, the laundromat 115 in Torstraße and the Vestithek in the Helene Nathan Library.

Poltische Haute Couture – STREETWARE X MIVUMBA im Bikini Berlin

Poltische Haute Couture – STREETWARE X MIVUMBA im Bikini Berlin

Poltische Haute Couture – STREETWARE X MIVUMBA im Bikini Berlin

Politische Haute Couture in der Box 12 der Galerie SLP i Bikini Berlin 19.11. -29.11.2021 © Astra Pentaxia

On September 12, STREETWARE invited to the catwalk of the socio-economic utopia at Tempelhofer Feld as part of the Berlin Fashion Week. Thirty models presented saved items from the Berlin asphalt and questioned the production methods of the fast fashion, but also the behavior of consumers. The canon of beauty ideals and aesthetics dictated by the fashion industry was put up for discussion by shiny people with bodies beyond the norm.

From November 19, some of their effigies were presented as large-format prints on canvas opposite photographs taken during a session in Kampala, the capital of Uganda, in July this year in collaboration between Ruth Faith Nalule, Eria Mutalwa, Rose Katusabe, Reagan Ahabwe, barbara caveng and photographer Jim Joël Nyakaana .

The images provided the aesthetic context for the presentation of the first pieces from Ruth Faith Nalule's collection of political haute couture. Behind bars, Box No12 of Galerie SLP at Bikini Berlin became the setting for an exploration of how much colonial continuity we wear on our skin and how much of the world we want to further destroy with fashion.

Die fashion designerin Ruth faith Nalule im ‚cage dress‘ an der Eröffnung am 19.11. im Bikini Berlin© Astra Pentaxia und  Purvi Dhranghadaryia

"There is no escape" - Ruth Faith Nalule's creations of 'political haute couture' describe the clash of European second-hand clothing exported to Africa and local manufactured fabric and garments: associations and images are connected, colonial continuity is interrupted:  The pin-up bunny is no longer grinning from the chest of a T-shirt by a Japanese Label, but sits fat on the bottom of a dress that fuses traditional Kitenge with an animal print dressing gown from Victoria's Secret, a lumberjack shirt from Germany and a Nike shirt: 'Blood the Body' lettering cut from a fast-fashion shirt, reminiscent of the Black Live Matters movement as underarm cuffs.. At the opening, the fashion designer and fashion activist wears the 'cage dress': her body, wrapped in a dress made again of kitenge, is caught in a mesh of strips of tire material, additionally knotted with sisal cord.

'The Congress on the Clothes Dump' described a series of events between September and November 2021 dedicated to an inclusive and participatory philosophizing about the meaning of clothes, their production, distribution and consumption. Invited guests and random attendees digged into textonic layers, searched for solutions, questioned the ethics of the second skin. Clothing protects and adorns. It represents basic aesthetic and existential needs, but its mode of production destroys the environment on a large scale and endangers the physical and psychological well-being of the people who cope with the manufacturing processes in socially intolerable conditions. How could sustainable production and economy look like - this is what we explored between November 16 and 28 together with author Beatrice Lamwaka, fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, photographer Jim Joel Nyakaana and Social Entrepreneur and environmental activist Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa in a multi-perspective way. Venues for the public pondering were Bikini Berlin, the laundromat 115 in Torstraße and the Vestithek in the Helene Nathan Library.

fast fashion secondhand Africa – don’t waste what you wear

fast fashion secondhand Africa – don’t waste what you wear

fast fashion secondhand Africa – don’t waste what you wear

fast fashion secondhand africa: Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa | KDindie©Paolo Gallo |26.11.2021

Das Wasser der Spree ist nicht süß - [The water of the Spree is neither sweet nor fresh] 

Days 10, 11 & 12 of the 'congress on the clothes heap'
Excerpt from the logbook of barbara caveng

 'I hope the tour was worthwhile for you ' - so it is friendly inquired in the email of 1.12.2021. Our friends are long since back in Uganda. In the morning of the 28th of November at 6:50 the plane had taken off punctually from Berlin in the direction Brussels and later in the morning left the continent behind, direction for Entebbe.

CUT
27.11.2021

I saw a tear run down Ruth's cheek. If pain burns, it must be hot. The warmth on that cold morning came from the pain. It was the 11th day of our sojourn, the last. We had set out to visit the African Quarter - where colonial history had inscribed itself in the street names. Mnyaka Sururu Mboro, who was to guide us, had suggested the Ugandan Street/African Street- junction, as a meeting point.

Viewpoints and insights at the corner of Uganda and African Street: Lotti Seebeck, Ruth Faith Naluke, Mnyaka Sururu Mboro, barbara caveng, Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa, Jim Joel Nyakaana ©Jim Joel Nyakaana, Céline Iffli-Naumann.

CUT
25.11.2021

"If you need a lot of space to board, the pier at the Caprivi Bridge is best",Astrid had advised on the phone. 'Where?'- 'Caprivi Bridge,' the shipping manager repeated, 'in Charlottenburg.' -'Caprivi - with K or with C?'-'With C.'

CUT
27.11.

source:www.welt.de/geschichte/article111963581/Deutschlands-Exportgut-nach-Afrika-war-Schnaps.html

I recognized a map in the hands of Mboro, more precisely - a copy of a map from a book. Later on the web I find a similar one: The map is drawn with pen and ink and colorized. Togo, German Southwest Africa, German East Africa and Cameroon are watercolored reddish-brown - the shade of dried blood. The borders are depicted as red hemlines. The contours of German Southwest Africa resemble a skull with a strange slender, beak-like outgrowth. The tentacle is bulging into northeastern Namibia.

CUT
26.11.

From U-Bismarckstraße we had moved to Caprivibrücke in a procession of rag pickers. Our hybrid vehicles were loaded with clothes from our collection of 'Saved Items' from the last ten months: We had picked up a ton of clothing and textiles from the asphalt of the city.

The Caprivi Bridge, named after Leo von Caprivi, Imperial chancellor after Bismarck between 1890 and 1894 

Since 1927, the Zambezi has meandered parallel to the Uganda Road through the African Quarter. In 1890, German interests focused on Africa's fourth largest river - after all, it seemed that a direct connection between German Southwest Africa and German East Africa could be established via the water. Germany ceded Zanzibar to England and in return "received" Heligoland and the aforementioned strip of land.

The word 'Zipfel' unavoidably makes me think of sausage.

Kisitu wore a classic wool coat, of a straight cut with narrow lapels over his grayish trousers with flaed legs down to the ankle, vest and shirt of an Indian label. We had all coveted the piece, but the garment did not fit anyone or the coat didn’t suit the wearer - until Kisitu tried it on. Its label: United Colours of Benetton - fished out of the gutter on some corner of the city - saved by Streetware. .

While we hoisted our rolling clothes racks over the railing and affixed our banner to the top deck, the social entrepreneur and environmental activist stood on the jetty of the Caprivi Strip giving an interview. The stern of the MS Sylvia pointed toward Westhafen. They call the Zambezi River 'the Spree' at this spot.

The Imperial Chancellor Caprivi came up with the clever plan of connecting German Southwest Africa and German East Africa, which was supposed to boost trade in colonial goods. However, his bold dreams were dashed at the Victoria Falls and his economic visions were shattered on the cliffs of the waterfalls.  

We sailed our rag boat past the containers on the harbour site of Westhafen, boxes that symbolize the global and often enough post-colonial trade in goods - like the export of our last season's fashion preferences disposed of in the clothing containers towards Africa.

The proud clinker facade of the Behala building blocks the view to LaGeSo (Landesamt für Flüchtlinge und Soziales). The limbo of the buildings is haunted by people without papers. Perhaps they came by ship from the Libyan coast across the Mediterranean, wearing the second-hand clothes that once hung in our closets.

We pass the Humboldt Forum - a museum site with global aspirations, in which colonial continuities in thought and action are shamefully manifested. One of the alliance partners of the campaign No-Humboldt 21 is the association Berlin Postkolonial, whose founding member is Mnyaka Sururu Mboro.

CUT
29.11.

Reading up: The Caprivi Strip on Namibian land was renamed the 'Zambezi Region' in August 2013. Since then, the port city of Lüderitz is called „!Nami≠Nüs“ -'Hug' 

fastfashion – Second Hand Africa – Don‘t waste what you wear!

 Dressed as ragamuffins à la mode in rags of fast fashion, we cruised merrily along the Spree and chanted our slogan with verve to passers-by on the banks. Eye patches instead of rose-colored glasses.

On the walk of remembrance in the African Quarter of Berlin, we as white and black humans had to endure, see, read and hear about what the historical basis is on which we meet as fellow colleagues and friends.

Why, I wonder, did the Caprivi Bridge not get a new name at the same time as the area was renamed Namibia? For example in 'Privi_Lege Bridge'.
This would not be an embrace but perhaps a rapprochement and the riverside beer garden would then perhaps be called 'Pleasure Garden of Privileges' and not CapRivi.

'The Congress on the Clothes Dump' described a series of events between September and November 2021 dedicated to an inclusive and participatory philosophizing about the meaning of clothes, their production, distribution and consumption. Invited guests and random attendees digged into textonic layers, searched for solutions, questioned the ethics of the second skin. Clothing protects and adorns. It represents basic aesthetic and existential needs, but its mode of production destroys the environment on a large scale and endangers the physical and psychological well-being of the people who cope with the manufacturing processes in socially intolerable conditions. How could sustainable production and economy look like - this is what we explored with people from the global - as well as Berlin - North and South in a multi-perspective way.

Mnyaka Sururu Mboro, born and raised in Tanzania, came to study in Germany in 1978 and then settled in Berlin. He is a board member and co-founder of Berlin Postkolonial e.V., and for decades has been active in advocating for a critical confrontation of German colonialism. One of his main concerns is the restitution of human remains, which were stolen during the German colonial era and which to the present day are found in the collections of the “Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz” (SPK), the “Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte” (BGAEU), as well as several other institutions all over Germany.
http://justlisten.berlin-postkolonial.de/en/mnyaka-sururu-mboro

Quelle Umbenennung der Stadt Lüderitz: www.dw.com/de/deutsche-ortsnamen-verschwinden/a-17009617#:~:text=Nami%E2%89%A0N%C3%BCs%22.,bis%201915%20eine%20deutsche%20Kolonie

CATWALK ZUR SOZIAL-ÖKONOMISCHEN UTOPIE

CATWALK TO A SOCIAL ECONOMIC UTOPIA

CATWALK TO A SOCIAL ECONOMIC UTOPIA

Laia, Pauli und Nazanin Shamloo©Anja_Grabert | 12.9.2021

IT DOES NOT MATTER IF A DRESS IS USED OR IF IT IS A NEW DRESS FROM SOME TRENDY BRAND, WHAT MATTERS IS THE SOUL THAT WEARS IT.

Lorenzo

 

Walk with us!

Wir machten die Flugbahn zum Catwalk und demonstrierten Mode vom Asphalt an hybriden Wäscheständern auf der Aufmarschfläche R11 des Tempelhofer Feldes!

Es demonstrierten für Fashion-Standards einer gerechteren Zukunft und als Beitrag zur Debatte um Körperbild und Ästhetik:

Alice Fassina | Aliyah Iffli | Annelie | Boris Steinberg | Céline Iffli-Naumann | Deborah Klassen | Freeda | Flora Carmim | Geneviève | Kdindie | Laia  |LaMoel | Laura-Marie Gruch  | Manuela Coelho | Marlene Sommer | NavaNaimaPan | Nazanin Shamloo  | Nomadin der Lüfte |Pauli | Philairone | Purvi Dhrangaderiya | Sara Tivane | Sarah Nevada Grether | Sophie Stolle | Zohara |

Training: Leonie N. Baur | José Caba | barbara caveng
Styling : STREETWARE saved item featuring Mo Lateef

Make Up & Haare:   Narong Boonme | Nazanin Emami | Olga Ionica Zavisic  | Reena Kumari | Sandrine Louise  |

Fotos Anja Grabert & Paolo Gallo

Im Kontext der Berlin Fashion Week forderte Berlins politischstes Mode-Label die Fast Fashion heraus, transformierte weggeworfene Textilien in prêt-à-porter und inszenierte soziale Plastik. Um mit Saved Items zur Bildung nachhaltiger Standards, fairer Produktionsketten und dekolonialisierter Lebensstilmuster beizutragen, veranstaltete STREETWARE den demonstrativen Catwalk der sozial-ökonomischen Utopie. Die präsentierten Fashion-Highlights stammten unmittelbar vom Asphalt der Straßen Berlins und dienten als provokanter Ausgangspunkt, um über Nachhaltigkeit, Produktionsweisen und soziale Praktik ins Gespräch zu kommen.

ICH LEGE AB

ich lege ab
die alten werte
ich streife ab
was mich schmückte
ich denke neu
denn dass, was mich entzückte
passt nicht mehr
liegt nicht mehr
angenehm
auf meiner haut

ich entdecke
mit geschlossenen augen
den wandel
den neubeginn
alles ist vorhanden
alles ist da
liegt auf den straßen
vor unseren füßen
es ist längst
nichts mehr so
wie es mal war

alles was uns getragen
alles was wir einst trugen
muss sich neu finden
sich neu ergründen
sehen und spüren
fühlen und hören
ein neues wissen
und….nichts mehr vermissen

die neuen kleider
werden die alten
nicht ersetzen
sie werden uns vielmehr
verletzen
wenn es so weitergeht
schutzlos und nackt
wie wir sind
im neubeginn
werden die alten kleider
mir zeigen
wer ich nun sein kann
ja, wer ich wirklich bin

/ borissteinberg @2021

Neben Nachhaltigkeit, Produktionsweisen und sozialer Praktik wurde das Diktat der  Schönheitsideale frei interpretiert und   Ästhetiken zur Debatte gestellt. Die Kollektion von STRRETWARE wurde auf dem Tempelhofer Feld präsentiert von Models, die durch ihre einzigartige Ausstrahlung  Normbegriffe sprengten und demonstrierten, was Schönheit wirklich bedeutet

Marlene Sommer hat sich den BMI vorgenommen:

Overweight – over WHAT weight?

Overnight, half the American population became “overweight”, just bc someone changed the BMI borders … wtf?

 In today’s society, the so-called “body-mass-index” is like a status symbol, sth that defines your class, the amount of appreciation you receive. We don’t compare the price of our house or car, the job of our partner… we compare ourselves. 

When everything else feels out of control, there’s sth we can do – that’s what we think. But we can’t fight our biology. Even if we all ate and moved the same, we’d still all look different. The BMI was introduced in the 1830s by a mathematician, not a biologist so there ain’t much science behind it.

There’s a beauty standard, so many ppl try to archive by going against their biological needs. Is that really what we want: The same boring looks, so that no one can differentiate us? What once made us humane and separated us from robots is what we all strive for. Others claim, they just wanted to be “normal”; fit in. Right… who defines that? That’s society. And who is society? Us – you and me🙌🏻. Why are we creating a norm, only certain ppl can “archive”? You can’t fight your biology.

Why not establish our true authentic self as the new normal? Flaws and stretch marks, rolls, and muscles. Let’s celebrate what our bodies DO for us instead of hating “all your curves and edges, all [our] perfect imperfections” as John Legend says in his song “All of me”.

Why don’t we appreciate the fact that we all look different? Ain’t it amazing that we’re one species but still all so unique

Be yourself, everyone else already exists.

The BMI was once supposed to be a guideline, sth to express ppl’s health easily. We’re smarter today: Health ain’t only about your weight, it’s physical sanity, mental health and so much more. Health ain’t a visual diagnosis. A normal weight is the one your body feels most comfortable at; your setpoint is individual, not a matter of BMI numbers!

Our body is our home🏡; our motor. We cannot cut the energy and expect electricity to still run. You can’t live a full life on an empty stomach. We need to start seeing our body as an instrument, not an ornament… it enables us to walk, laugh, write, talk, visit places. Don’t miss out on 95% of life only to weight 5% less

Do you wanna walk with us too?

ein poetische Fragestellung und eine Hommage an die abgestreiften Textilien von NavaNaimaPan

Ich komme Nachhause. Öffne die Tür zu einem Zimmer, das seines war, heute meines ist.  In der Mitte steht ein Bett, ungemacht, so als hätte er letzte Nacht noch darin geträumt. Behutsam setzte ich mich auf die Bettkante. Es gehört mir noch nicht, Höflichkeit ist angebracht. Ich entdecke eine alte Holztruhe, öffne sie ohne Erwartung etwas darin zu finden, vielmehr mit dem Gedanken, ob und was ich hineinlegen könnte. Einrichten.

 

Der Geruch von ausgetragenen Turnschuhen und modrigen Klamotten steigt aus der Holzkiste, entblösst eine Jeansjacke. Ich ziehe sie hinaus, schüttele sie aus, als ob der Geruch so vom Stoff abfallen könnte, ziehe sie mir über. Sie ist zu gross.

Ich frage mich, wie die selbe Jacke über seine Schultern fällt.

Ich widme mich meinem Rucksack, packe die Kleider aus. Die gestreifte Hose mit Schlag. Heute gehört sie ihr und mir, wir teilen sie uns. Wem wohl davor?

Der Schal, der auf der Brücke im Wind hing. Wer trug ihn gegen die beissende Biese um den Hals geschlungen? Wer friert heute ohne das Tuch?

Der rote, samtige Pulli, den ich vor dem Haus, in dem ich damals wohnte, auf der Mauer fand.

Textile; Gewobenes, Gewirktes. Textile, die sich um Menschen webten, auf Menschen wirkten. Textile, die sich um Menschen weben, auf Menschen wirken.

hManche von Ihnen werden ein Zuhause. Ich denke dabei an den Fliegerhut eines verstorbenen Grossvaters. Ich trage ihn auf dem Kopf und der Hut mich durch den Winter.

Ich mag Hüte. Ein kleines Dach über dem Kopf. Ein Zuhause eben.

In neues Jeans gehüllt, trete ich auf die fremden Strassen hinaus. Menschen gehen sie auf und ab. Kleider und Leute; sie machen sich in Wechselwirkung.

Da, am Strassenrand liegt eine schmale Trainerjacke. Ich denke an eine junge Frau. Eine, die in Bangladesch zwischen dutzend anderen jungen Frauen drei weisse Streifen auf die blaue Stoffjacke aufnäht. An eine junge Frau, die nach dem Workout verschwitzt friert, sich dieselbe Jacke hier im Westen überzieht.

Ich bin als eine der Passant:innen weiter durch die Strassen geschlendert. Mich mit jedem Schritt weitergedacht, einmal ostwärts und wieder zurück.

Ich biege in eine kleinere Strasse ab, hab mich verloren, dabei fällt mein Blick auf drei aneinandergereihter Schuhpaare. Ich sehe darin Kinderfüsse, sie spielen aufgeregt durch den Trubel der Stadt.

Der Herbst bläst und färbt zwischen den Häusern, ich vergrabe mich im Blau der Jeansjacke und bilde mir ein, ihn leise spüren zu können. Ihn, der die Jacke vor mir trug. Fast ist es so, als gingen wir gemeinsam, we walk together. Do you wanna walk with us too?

Join us and become an influencer for a better future: ecologize, decolonize and degender your style!

VESTITHEK

VESTITHEQUE

VESTITHEQUE

STREETWARE saved item - Berlin's most sustainable fashion label launched on September 15, 2021 its second pop up flagship store in Berlin Neukölln.

At the Helene Nathan Library, the store offered a spectacular selection of clothing from the streets of Neukölln for three months starting September 15 until December 15: STREETWARE at its purest! In our store, people can marvel at, try on and borrow genuine street clothes. 

Why borrowing clothes is fun and trendy? The saved items not only shine with an aestethic of diversity that meets the boldest demands for style people of all stripes will find it here - our clothes contain curiosities mesh wise. The textiles also tell a story: the faded jeans with a used look by Levi's, the leather skirt by Gianni Versace, the knitted jumper by Kickers or the little black dress by Dior take us to China, Bangladesh, Turkey. They recount transcontinental journeys of the people who made the clothes and the bodies that wore them. But they also remind us of the dark side of the fashion industry: low wages, poor working conditions in the Global South, the environmental impact of unsustainable raw material extraction and toxic dyes. 

STREETWARE saved item is looking for these stories on the streets of Neukölln, saves, archives and publishes them, so that people can get in touch with them like with the heroes of their favorite novel. 

At Helene-Nathan Library stories inform and inspire. This is where we tied in: Trough the narrative of textiles STREETWARE saved item explored the culture of 'discarded clothing' regarding its social significances: the garments shed lights on production methods, consumption and identity. 

PurviDhranghadaryia advised you on sustainable and stylistic issues between September 15 to December 15, 2021 - Mondays & Wednesdays from 1 to 7 pm and Saturdays from 10 am to 1 pm. Montag & Mittwoch von 13:00-19:00 Uhr und am Samstag von 10:00-13:00 Uhr.

s

Become an influencer with us and join our movement for a wearable future: Degender and decolonise your style!

The Vestitheque was realised in the frame of 'The Congress on the Clothes Dump' . These Congress described a series of events between September and November 2021 dedicated to an inclusive and participatory philosophizing about the meaning of clothes, their production, distribution and consumption. Invited guests and random attendees digged into textonic layers, searched for solutions, questioned the ethics of the second skin. Clothing protects and adorns. It represents basic aesthetic and existential needs, but its mode of production destroys the environment on a large scale and endangers the physical and psychological well-being of the people who cope with the manufacturing processes in socially intolerable conditions. How could sustainable production and economy look like - this is what we explored between November 16 and 28 together with author Beatrice Lamwaka, fashion designer Ruth Faith Nalule, photographer Jim Joel Nyakaana and Social Entrepreneur and environmental activist Kisitu Aloysius Musanyusa in a multi-perspective way. Venues for the public pondering were Bikini Berlin, the laundromat 115 in Torstraße and the Vestithek in the Helene Nathan Library.

The Vestithek's offer to borrow garments at the Helene-Nathan Library is accompanied by a framework program. Two lectures, a panel discussion and two hands-on workshops will serve as a starting point for an interdisciplinary exploration of the promises of clothing and fashion - the fabric in which we wrap our dreams and which, in excess, becomes a nightmare for people and the planet.

Wäsche En Plein Air

Laundry 'En Plein Air'

Laundry 'En Plein Air'

STREETWARE saved item En Plein Air at the 48 hours Neukölln, forum for artistic projects from all sectors of the Berlin art scene. 
On the 19th and 20th of June 2021 | Installation featuring 48 laundry racks | Körnerpark Berlin-Neukölln
all photos © Paolo Gallo

Over the course of two days during the art festival 48 Stunden Neuköllnthe STREETWARE saved item team transformed itself into true plein air painters.As location and motif for our painting sessions, we chose the magnificent landscapes of the Körnerpark in Neukölln.

Alice Fassina rings in the big wash!

On the early hours of a Saturday, on the 19th of June, we set up our unique easels in front of the Galerie im Körnerpark and began to paint using some very unusual colours: Our ‘saved items’ – clothes saved by our own team – were hanging over 48 laundry racks that were collected from the streets of Berlin or kindly donated by people from the community: The colour palette we could choose from was made up entirely of the wardrobes of Neukölln's inhabitants and came together to form a neo-impressionist tableau. 

The sculptural intervention 'En Plein Air' performed different roles:

A piece of art:
The laundry flowing in the open air created a distinctive contrast to the architectural design of the gallery in the Orangery and the overall look of the park. The domestic activity of laundry-making now took place in a neo—baroque green space, playfully experimenting both with social etiquette and washing instructions.

A participative installation:
Everyone was encouraged to take pieces of clothing home with them, contribute items from their own wardrobes or exchange garments for one another. During the two days, the installation continuously assumed new unexpected and unpredictable colours and shapes.

A cluster of a circular exchange of ideas:
Our community of ragpickers provided an open space to explore questions of identity and sociality, consumerism and modes of fashion production. The participating audience confirmed once again that not only the need for clothing but the joy of dressing up is something that unites us all, regardless of age, gender or language.

An unusual experience:  The most curious participants booked a STREET SHOPPING tour with us and got to experience first-hand how much fun a ragpicker has at work. As we cruised through the neighbourhood, saving discarded clothing, we contemplated the impact of fashion and the global textile industry on our lives and the environment. No tour ever ended without textile trophies on mobile clothes racks and many a garment already found a new owner during our city strolls.

The last STREET SHOPPING tour was led by Cryptida furry fairy-being: an entity without gender, she/he/it went searching for human 'i-thems', exploring them on his/her own body.

On Sunday evening, 20th of June, a concert by the event series 'Sommer im Park' accompanied the dismantling of our installation and we left the baroque park with the Citizen's new clothes, brimming with memories of interesting conversations and moving encounters.

We would like to thank all STREETWARE team members and friends who made 'En Plein Air' possible at a scorching 36 degrees:

 Alice Fassina | Hatim Alyafi | Céline Iffli-Naumann | Jan Markowsky | Stella Cristofolini | Lina Tegtmeyer | Aïcha Abbadi | Andreas Herbst | KDindi | Paolo Gallo | Daniela Sant | Jule Kox | Anneta Pap | Therry Konrath | Marie Lou Honert | Chiara Radina |

And one more thing: The journalist Hanna Komornitzyk  has written in art-in-berlin- about STREETWARE saved item En Plein Air at 48 hours Neukölln

En Plein Air' at the art festival '48 hours Neukölln ' was supported by the Creative Matterz Fund

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